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Kapangan, Benguet Province
By Everyday Coffee Roasters
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The Municipality of Kapangan, is a 4th class municipality in the province of Benguet. Its Cordillera Green Network (CGN) has planted 8513 arabica coffee seedlings in 2010, 31,470 Arabica coffee seedlings in 2012-2014, and 7,200 seedlings in 2016. Support network also conducted quality improvement seminars in 2016,2017 and 2019; also provided post-harvest materials

Sourced by YAGAM COFFEE.

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YAGAM COFFEE
By Everyday Coffee Roasters

YAGAM COFFEE is the finest arabica coffee in the Cordillera region, the Northern part of Luzon in the Philippines.

The Cordillera region is surrounded by steep mountains wherein the indigenous people residing there have no means of living.

The Cordillera Green Network (CGN), an environmental NGO based in Baguio City, works to preserve the environment and improve the quality of life for indigenous people in the Cordillera region, they have been distributing arabica coffee seedlings as well as providing training on how to grow coffee under the agroforestry system since 2006. Now, many coffee growers have begun harvesting and producing good quality coffee. For sustainable coffee farming, CGN has a partnership with Kapi Tako Social Enterprise to marketize their coffees under the concept of Fairtrade in 2010.

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Burundi Ruiria
By Everyday Coffee Roasters
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Coffee production has been something of a roller coaster in Burundi, with wild ups and downs: During the country’s time as a Belgian colony, coffee was a cash crop, with exports mainly going back to Europe or to feed the demand for coffee by Europeans in other colonies. Under Belgian rule, Burundian farmers were forced to grow a certain number of coffee trees each—of course receiving very little money or recognition for the work. Once the country gained its independence in the 1960s, the coffee sector (among others) was privatized, stripping control from the government except when necessary for research or price stabilization and intervention. Coffee farming had left a bad taste, however, and fell out of favor; quality declined, and coffee plants were torn up or abandoned.

This bourbon arabica coffee grows between the soybeans, bananas, and Grevillea. The coffee is picked by a group of 210 farmers. On average each farmer has 300 trees. After picking the red cherries, the fruit is brought to the wet mill the same day. There the coffee is washed and fermented in water tanks between 14 and 16 hours. The parchment is then dried for 10 to 14 days, depending on the weather. The wet mill has 200 drying beds and stores the coffee in a ventilated warehouse.

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